The Detection of Gravitational Waves: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy

 

LECTURER
Prof. Gabriele Vedovato
Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare

DATE: 3 September 2018
TIME: 10:00 – 11:00  pm
LOCATION: Rigoni Stern Institute, Asiago

The Detection of Gravitational Waves: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy

On Sept. 14, 2015, the gravitational waves from two black holes reached Earth and resulted in the first direct observations of gravitational waves. This confirmed a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opened an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos. In this talk, I will present an overview of what gravitational waves are, how LIGO and Virgo interferometers detected them, and what we have learned so far. I will discuss the exciting new perspectives opened after the discovery of the spectacular collision of two neutron stars viewed for the first time both as gravitational waves by interferometers and light by other telescopes on Earth and in space, resulting in a new multi-messenger astronomy.

Gabriele Vedovato is a physicist of the Padova Section of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in Padova, Italy. He is involved by over 25 years in the Gravitational Waves detection: initially (1992-2007) he has carried out research activities with the AURIGA experiment and since 2007 he is part of the European Virgo collaboration. He is currently involved in the join Virgo LIGO data analysis activity. He played a significant role in the development of the data analysis methods that allowed the first gravitational wave detection and in the analysis used as a further confirmation of the astrophysical origin of the observed signal.

  • AURIGA is a gravitational waves detector located at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Padova)
  • Virgo is an interferometer gravitational waves detector located at near Pisa (Italy)
  • LIGO is a Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory located in USA

 

Recent scientific publications:

Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger, Published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)

Observing Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914 with Minimal Assumptions, Published in Phys. Rev. D 93, 122004 (2016)

Method for detection and reconstruction of gravitational wave transients with networks of advanced detectors, Published in Phys. Rev. D 93, no4. 042004 (2016)

GW170104: Observation of a 50-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence at Redshift 0.2, Published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 221101

“LIGO web-site”https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/

“LIGO Educational Resources”https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/educational-resources

“LIGO Detection Papers”https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/detection-companion-papers

“EGO VIRGO web-site”https://www.ego-gw.it/

“Padova-Trento Virgo group web-site” http://www.virgo.lnl.infn.it/en/

https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/gravitational-waveshttp://public.virgo-gw.eu/language/en/

https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/gravitational-waveshttp://public.virgo-gw.eu/language/en/